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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, David A
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-15T13:31:35Z
dc.date.available2023-05-15T13:31:35Z
dc.date.issued2023-05
dc.identifier.citationChaplin, W.J. et al. (2023) ‘The bidirectional relationship between chronic joint pain and frailty: data from the Investigating Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing cohort’, BMC geriatrics, 23(1), p. 273.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/16987
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pain and frailty are associated, but this relationship is insufficiently understood. We aimed to test whether there is a unidirectional or bidirectional relationship between joint pain and frailty. Methods: Data were from Investigating Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing, a UK-based cohort. Average joint pain severity over the previous month was assessed using an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS). Frailty was classified as present/absent using the FRAIL questionnaire. Multivariable regression assessed the association between joint pain and frailty, adjusted for age, sex, and BMI class. Two-wave cross-lagged path modelling permitted simultaneous exploration of plausible causal pathways between pain intensity and frailty at baseline and 1-year. Transitions were assessed using t-tests. Results: One thousand one hundred seventy-nine participants were studied, 53% female, with a median age of 73 (range 60 to 95) years. FRAIL classified 176 (15%) participants as frail at baseline. Mean (SD) baseline pain score was 5.2 (2.5). Pain NRS ≥ 4 was observed in 172 (99%) of frail participants. Pain severity was associated with frailty at baseline (aOR 1.72 (95%CI 1.56 to 1.92)). In cross-lagged path analysis, higher baseline pain predicted 1-year frailty [β = 0.25, (95%CI 0.14 to 0.36), p < 0.001] and baseline frailty predicted higher 1-year pain [β = 0.06, (95%CI 0.003 to 0.11), p = 0.040]. Participants transitioning to frailty over one year had higher mean pain scores (6.4 (95%CI 5.8 to 7.1)) at baseline than those who remained non-frail (4.7 (95%CI 4.5 to 4.8)), p < 0.001. Conclusions: The bidirectional relationship between pain and frailty could lead to a vicious cycle in which each accelerates the other's progression. This justifies attempts to prevent frailty by addressing pain and to include pain measures as an outcome in frailty studies.
dc.description.urihttps://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12877-023-03949-4en_US
dc.publisherBMC Geriatricsen_US
dc.subjectChronic painen_US
dc.subjectFrailtyen_US
dc.subjectOlder peopleen_US
dc.titleThe bidirectional relationship between chronic joint pain and frailty: data from the Investigating Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing cohort.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s12877-023-03949-4en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-05-15T13:31:36Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractBackground: Pain and frailty are associated, but this relationship is insufficiently understood. We aimed to test whether there is a unidirectional or bidirectional relationship between joint pain and frailty. Methods: Data were from Investigating Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing, a UK-based cohort. Average joint pain severity over the previous month was assessed using an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS). Frailty was classified as present/absent using the FRAIL questionnaire. Multivariable regression assessed the association between joint pain and frailty, adjusted for age, sex, and BMI class. Two-wave cross-lagged path modelling permitted simultaneous exploration of plausible causal pathways between pain intensity and frailty at baseline and 1-year. Transitions were assessed using t-tests. Results: One thousand one hundred seventy-nine participants were studied, 53% female, with a median age of 73 (range 60 to 95) years. FRAIL classified 176 (15%) participants as frail at baseline. Mean (SD) baseline pain score was 5.2 (2.5). Pain NRS ≥ 4 was observed in 172 (99%) of frail participants. Pain severity was associated with frailty at baseline (aOR 1.72 (95%CI 1.56 to 1.92)). In cross-lagged path analysis, higher baseline pain predicted 1-year frailty [β = 0.25, (95%CI 0.14 to 0.36), p < 0.001] and baseline frailty predicted higher 1-year pain [β = 0.06, (95%CI 0.003 to 0.11), p = 0.040]. Participants transitioning to frailty over one year had higher mean pain scores (6.4 (95%CI 5.8 to 7.1)) at baseline than those who remained non-frail (4.7 (95%CI 4.5 to 4.8)), p < 0.001. Conclusions: The bidirectional relationship between pain and frailty could lead to a vicious cycle in which each accelerates the other's progression. This justifies attempts to prevent frailty by addressing pain and to include pain measures as an outcome in frailty studies.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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