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dc.contributor.authorMistry, Dipti
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-23T13:07:14Z
dc.date.available2023-05-23T13:07:14Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationBroadley, L. E., Burton, A. E. & Mistry, D. K. (2023). “sharing in people's pain is not an easy thing to do”: Cognitive behavioural therapists' understandings of compassion in the workplace. Counselling & Psychotherapy Research, DOI: 10.1002/capr.12614.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1002/capr.12614
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/17064
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2023 The Authors. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.
dc.description.abstractObjectives Compassion is central to the aim of improving patient care and staff well‐being within healthcare systems. To inform service development, explorations of experiences and meanings of compassion are needed. This study explored cognitive behavioural therapists' understandings of compassion within their work environment. Design A qualitative study was conducted using semistructured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Methods Data were obtained from five practicing cognitive behavioural therapists. Results Two superordinate themes were developed, each with two subordinate themes. CBT therapists reported entering the profession with intrinsic motivation to care for others. They further developed an interest in compassion with exposure to clients and ongoing professional development in compassion‐focused therapy (CFT). Compassionate work environments helped to facilitate compassionate practice; however, for many, workplaces were perceived to lack compassion. Challenges were encountered when negative workplace interactions left therapists feeling fatigued, distressed and demoralised. There was a desire for recognition and to be seen as more than a “work machine,” the experience of which was a threat to retaining therapists within the profession. Conclusions Current recruitment and training processes are producing staff with skills and motivation to deliver compassionate care. However, lack of compassion within workplaces can be a barrier to actioning these skills and motivations. Research needs to focus on how to effectively implement and run systems that are compassionate for both staff and clients. To provide compassionate care, staff need work environments that show compassion to them. These findings provide some insights into and practical suggestions regarding how this can be achieved. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
dc.description.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/capr.12614en_US
dc.formatFull text uploaded
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCognitive behavioural therapyen_US
dc.subjectTherapeutic communityen_US
dc.title“sharing in people's pain is not an easy thing to do”: Cognitive behavioural therapists' understandings of compassion in the workplaceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2024-02-09T14:36:32Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2023-01-16
html.description.abstractObjectives Compassion is central to the aim of improving patient care and staff well‐being within healthcare systems. To inform service development, explorations of experiences and meanings of compassion are needed. This study explored cognitive behavioural therapists' understandings of compassion within their work environment. Design A qualitative study was conducted using semistructured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Methods Data were obtained from five practicing cognitive behavioural therapists. Results Two superordinate themes were developed, each with two subordinate themes. CBT therapists reported entering the profession with intrinsic motivation to care for others. They further developed an interest in compassion with exposure to clients and ongoing professional development in compassion‐focused therapy (CFT). Compassionate work environments helped to facilitate compassionate practice; however, for many, workplaces were perceived to lack compassion. Challenges were encountered when negative workplace interactions left therapists feeling fatigued, distressed and demoralised. There was a desire for recognition and to be seen as more than a “work machine,” the experience of which was a threat to retaining therapists within the profession. Conclusions Current recruitment and training processes are producing staff with skills and motivation to deliver compassionate care. However, lack of compassion within workplaces can be a barrier to actioning these skills and motivations. Research needs to focus on how to effectively implement and run systems that are compassionate for both staff and clients. To provide compassionate care, staff need work environments that show compassion to them. These findings provide some insights into and practical suggestions regarding how this can be achieved. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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