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dc.contributor.authorHolt, G
dc.contributor.authorAl-Khyatt, Waleed
dc.contributor.authorIdris, Iskandar
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-20T14:10:02Z
dc.date.available2023-06-20T14:10:02Z
dc.identifier.citationObes Surg. 2023 May 4. doi: 10.1007/s11695-023-06557-8. Online ahead of print.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/17222
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is prevalent among patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Previous studies have reported a higher risk of complications, ICU admission and longer length of stay in patients with OSA following surgery. However, clinical outcomes following bariatric surgery are unclear. The hypothesis is that patients with OSA will have an increased risk of these outcome measures after bariatric surgery. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the research question. Searches for bariatric surgery and obstructive sleep apnoea were performed using PubMed and Ovid Medline. Studies which compared OSA and non-OSA patients undergoing bariatric surgery and used outcome measures that included length of stay, risk of complications, 30-day readmission and need for ICU admission were selected for the systematic review. Comparable datasets from these studies were used for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: Patients with OSA are at greater risk of complications after bariatric surgery (RR = 1.23 [CI: 1.01, 1.5], P = 0.04), driven mostly by an increased risk of cardiac complications (RR = 2.44 [CI: 1.26, 4.76], P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between the OSA and non-OSA cohorts in the other outcome variables (respiratory complications, length of stay, 30-day readmission and need for ICU admission). CONCLUSION: Following bariatric surgery, patients with OSA must be managed carefully due to the increased risk of cardiac complications. However, patients with OSA are not more likely to require a longer length of stay or readmission.
dc.subjectSleep Apnoeaen_US
dc.subjectBariatric Surgeryen_US
dc.titlePeri- and Postoperative Outcomes for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Patients after Bariatric Surgery-a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s11695-023-06557-8en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-20T14:10:04Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2023-05
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is prevalent among patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Previous studies have reported a higher risk of complications, ICU admission and longer length of stay in patients with OSA following surgery. However, clinical outcomes following bariatric surgery are unclear. The hypothesis is that patients with OSA will have an increased risk of these outcome measures after bariatric surgery. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the research question. Searches for bariatric surgery and obstructive sleep apnoea were performed using PubMed and Ovid Medline. Studies which compared OSA and non-OSA patients undergoing bariatric surgery and used outcome measures that included length of stay, risk of complications, 30-day readmission and need for ICU admission were selected for the systematic review. Comparable datasets from these studies were used for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: Patients with OSA are at greater risk of complications after bariatric surgery (RR = 1.23 [CI: 1.01, 1.5], P = 0.04), driven mostly by an increased risk of cardiac complications (RR = 2.44 [CI: 1.26, 4.76], P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between the OSA and non-OSA cohorts in the other outcome variables (respiratory complications, length of stay, 30-day readmission and need for ICU admission). CONCLUSION: Following bariatric surgery, patients with OSA must be managed carefully due to the increased risk of cardiac complications. However, patients with OSA are not more likely to require a longer length of stay or readmission.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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