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dc.contributor.authorFrost, Alexandra C.
dc.date.accessioned2023-12-20T11:51:17Z
dc.date.available2023-12-20T11:51:17Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationFrost, A., Moghaddam, N. & Burge, R. (2023). Exploring the potential of SMART for improving cognitive health in people with multiple sclerosis In: Furie, K., (Ed.) MSMilan2023, October 2023 Milan London: Multiple Sclerosis Journal p.645-646.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1177/1352458523
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/17989
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: For people living with multiple sclerosis (MS), cognitive difficulties (including problems with attention, planning, and problem-solving) are a common and particularly debilitating and distressing consequence. The efficacy of cognitive training and rehabilitation remains unclear, leaving a need to establish suitable evidence-based treatment options. Objectives/Aims: In response to the current state of evidence, we aim to examine the feasibility of trialling SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training) - a theory-based online cognitive training programme - as a treatment option for improving cognitive health in people with multiple sclerosis. Method(s): We are recruiting 60 patients with MS and cognitive impairment to a three-arm feasibility randomised-controlled trial, comparing (1) SMART + treatment-as-usual (TAU) with (2) TAU and (3) active control ('sham') training + TAU. Consenting eligible patients complete a cognitive assessment battery and questionnaires assessing the impact of living with MS, health-related quality of life, subjective cognitive difficulties, and service/ resource use. After completing baseline assessments, participants are randomly allocated to one of the three trial arms. Participants complete follow-up assessments at 3 and 6 months post-randomisation and take part in feasibility-feedback interviews. Our critical criteria for progression to a full-scale trial are around intervention acceptability ('green' = >=80% of SMART group completing >=6 sessions of SMART training), recruitment (green = >=80% of target N consented/randomised), and retention (green = >=80% of all randomised participants completing three-month follow-up). Result(s): Based on available data (53 participants enrolled to date), we are currently green on intervention acceptability (91%) and retention (97%). We appear green for recruitment (90% of target enrolled); identified latencies between consent and randomisation complicate the picture, but (in consultation with our Trial Steering Committee) we have identified ways to address latencies in full-scale trialling. Conclusion(s): Assessment against core criteria currently favours progression and indicates that a full trial would be feasible. Qualitative feedback suggests that SMART can be a usable and acceptable programme for people with MS, supporting further investigation and efficacy testing (of effects on cognitive health outcomes and broader quality of life).
dc.description.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/13524585231196194en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.titleExploring the potential of SMART for improving cognitive health in people with multiple sclerosisen_US
dc.typeConference Proceedingen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeConference Paper/Proceeding/Abstracten_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2023-10-11
html.description.abstractIntroduction: For people living with multiple sclerosis (MS), cognitive difficulties (including problems with attention, planning, and problem-solving) are a common and particularly debilitating and distressing consequence. The efficacy of cognitive training and rehabilitation remains unclear, leaving a need to establish suitable evidence-based treatment options. Objectives/Aims: In response to the current state of evidence, we aim to examine the feasibility of trialling SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training) - a theory-based online cognitive training programme - as a treatment option for improving cognitive health in people with multiple sclerosis. <br/>Method(s): We are recruiting 60 patients with MS and cognitive impairment to a three-arm feasibility randomised-controlled trial, comparing (1) SMART + treatment-as-usual (TAU) with (2) TAU and (3) active control ('sham') training + TAU. Consenting eligible patients complete a cognitive assessment battery and questionnaires assessing the impact of living with MS, health-related quality of life, subjective cognitive difficulties, and service/ resource use. After completing baseline assessments, participants are randomly allocated to one of the three trial arms. Participants complete follow-up assessments at 3 and 6 months post-randomisation and take part in feasibility-feedback interviews. Our critical criteria for progression to a full-scale trial are around intervention acceptability ('green' = >=80% of SMART group completing >=6 sessions of SMART training), recruitment (green = >=80% of target N consented/randomised), and retention (green = >=80% of all randomised participants completing three-month follow-up). <br/>Result(s): Based on available data (53 participants enrolled to date), we are currently green on intervention acceptability (91%) and retention (97%). We appear green for recruitment (90% of target enrolled); identified latencies between consent and randomisation complicate the picture, but (in consultation with our Trial Steering Committee) we have identified ways to address latencies in full-scale trialling. <br/>Conclusion(s): Assessment against core criteria currently favours progression and indicates that a full trial would be feasible. Qualitative feedback suggests that SMART can be a usable and acceptable programme for people with MS, supporting further investigation and efficacy testing (of effects on cognitive health outcomes and broader quality of life).en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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