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dc.contributor.authorGroom, Madeleine J.
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-11T15:50:07Z
dc.date.available2024-01-11T15:50:07Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationBellato, A., Wiersema, J. R. & Groom, M. J. (2023). Autonomic nervous system functioning in ADHD. In: Matson, J. L. (ed.) Clinical handbook of ADHD assessment and treatment across the lifespan Cham: Springer International Publishing, pp. 37-75.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1007/978-3-031-41709-2_3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/18076
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter, we introduce the autonomic nervous system (ANS), discuss the mechanisms underlying arousal regulation in humans, and present theoretical frameworks suggesting that altered autonomic functioning is likely to contribute to behavioral, cognitive, and emotional difficulties experienced by people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reviewed evidence in this chapter suggests that autonomic hypofunctioning and difficulties in regulating arousal according to situational demands may cause inattention, restlessness, reduced vigilance and cognitive difficulties (especially during monotonous and unrewarding activities), and emotional dysregulation and irritability in people with ADHD. Although the chapter is specifically focused on ADHD, we also provide the reader with an overview of the literature investigating autonomic dysfunction in psychiatric or psychological conditions that often co-occur with ADHD, including oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, mood disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. We discuss the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for ADHD on autonomic functioning, and we propose that ADHD medication and some nonpharmacological interventions may be effective in reducing inattention and hyperactivity, and improving global functioning in people with ADHD, because they normalize activity of the ANS and improve arousal regulation. The concluding sections include a brief discussion about the possible implications of the findings presented in this chapter for clinical and research practice. Specifically, we stress the importance of clarifying, in future research, the role of altered autonomic functioning in ADHD, which could prove helpful for developing more efficient and valid assessment and intervention tools for people with this neurodevelopmental condition.
dc.description.urihttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-031-41709-2_3en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishingen_US
dc.subjectAttention deficit disorder with hyperactivityen_US
dc.subjectPharmacologyen_US
dc.titleAutonomic nervous system functioning in ADHDen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2023-11-22
html.description.abstractIn this chapter, we introduce the autonomic nervous system (ANS), discuss the mechanisms underlying arousal regulation in humans, and present theoretical frameworks suggesting that altered autonomic functioning is likely to contribute to behavioral, cognitive, and emotional difficulties experienced by people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reviewed evidence in this chapter suggests that autonomic hypofunctioning and difficulties in regulating arousal according to situational demands may cause inattention, restlessness, reduced vigilance and cognitive difficulties (especially during monotonous and unrewarding activities), and emotional dysregulation and irritability in people with ADHD. Although the chapter is specifically focused on ADHD, we also provide the reader with an overview of the literature investigating autonomic dysfunction in psychiatric or psychological conditions that often co-occur with ADHD, including oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, mood disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. We discuss the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for ADHD on autonomic functioning, and we propose that ADHD medication and some nonpharmacological interventions may be effective in reducing inattention and hyperactivity, and improving global functioning in people with ADHD, because they normalize activity of the ANS and improve arousal regulation. The concluding sections include a brief discussion about the possible implications of the findings presented in this chapter for clinical and research practice. Specifically, we stress the importance of clarifying, in future research, the role of altered autonomic functioning in ADHD, which could prove helpful for developing more efficient and valid assessment and intervention tools for people with this neurodevelopmental condition.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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