• Dermatological surgery: an update on suture materials and techniques. Part 1

      Veitch, David; Wernham, Aaron
      Significant variation exists in the surgical suture materials and techniques used for dermatological surgery. Many wound-closure techniques are now practised, including use of sutures, staples and topical adhesives. The focus of our review article is to summarize the latest evidence relating to suture materials and wound-closure techniques, considering the following areas: scar/cosmesis, pain, patient satisfaction, cost, infection and wound complications. We searched the databases Medline, PubMed and Embase using the keywords 'skin surgery', 'dermatologic surgery', 'sutures', 'suture techniques', 'suturing techniques' and 'surgical techniques' to identify relevant English-language articles. Absorbable superficial sutures may be a preferred alternative to nonabsorbable sutures by both patients and surgeons. Subcuticular sutures may be preferable to simple interrupted sutures for superficial wound closure, and there may also be a role for skin staples in dermatological surgery, particularly on the scalp. However, there remains limited evidence specific to dermatological surgery supporting the use of particular suture materials and suturing techniques. Further high-quality research is required, including multicentre randomized trials with larger cohorts.
    • Dermatological surgery: an update on suture materials and techniques. Part 2

      Veitch, David; Wernham, Aaron
      This is the second part of a two-part series summarizing the latest evidence related to suture materials and wound closure techniques in dermatological surgery. We critically appraised evidence focusing on the following consequences of suture choice: scar/cosmesis, pain, patient satisfaction, cost, infection and wound complications. We searched the databases MEDLINE, PubMed and Embase using the keywords ‘skin surgery’, ‘dermatological surgery’, ‘sutures’, ‘braided sutures’, ‘monofilament sutures’ and ‘antibacterial sutures’ to identify relevant English-language articles. This part of the review assesses the evidence for different types of buried sutures, including braided vs. monofilament sutures, longer-absorbing sutures and antibacterial sutures. The majority of trials were noted to be of poor quality, single-centre (thus lacking external validity) and underpowered, which presents challenges in comparing suture techniques in skin surgery. Future large-scale, multicentre, randomized trials are needed, with both surgeon and patient-assessed validated outcomes.