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dc.contributor.authorOlaoye, H
dc.contributor.authorAnyanwagu, Uche
dc.contributor.authorIdris, Iskandar
dc.contributor.authorWilmot, Emma
dc.contributor.authorJennings, P
dc.contributor.authorAshton-Cleary, S
dc.contributor.authorSugunendran, Suma
dc.contributor.authorHughes, D
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T17:15:25Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T17:15:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.citationDiabetic Medicine; Mar 2016; vol. 33 ; p. 95-96en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/471
dc.descriptionAuthor(s) Pre Print Version. 12 Month Embargo on Post Print. No PDFen
dc.description.abstractContinuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy for Type 1 diabetes can provide long-term, sustained improvements in glycaemic control and a reduction in hypoglycaemia. We aimed to assess the impact of CSII on quality of life and confidence in diabetes management. Methods: Patient-level data were obtained from the hospital electronic records for 220 CSII users from the Royal Derby Hospital. Patient confidence and satisfaction questionnaires were sent by post. A Likert scale was used to assess confidence in aspects of self-management. STATA v.13 was used for data analysis. Results: 54% (n = 119) responded; mean age 47.8 +/- 14.1 years; 58.8% female. Pre-CSII HbA1c was 9.1 +/- 1.8%; CSII duration 4.3 years (interquartile range 2.6+/-7.2) and most recent HbA1c 8.2 +/- 1.2%. 82.4% (n = 98) had pre-CSII structured education. Almost all patients reported that CSII improved their quality of life (94.2%, n = 114) and reduced the frequency of hypoglycaemia (79.8%, n = 95). The majority felt confident to carbohydrate count (90.8%, n = 108); check blood glucose >4/day (80.1%, n = 105); test and adjust CSII basal rates (69.7%, n = 83; 80.7%, n = 96 respectively). A quarter did not feel confident to use sick day rules (26.9%, n = 32) or adjust their insulin:carbohydrate ratio (26%, n = 31). Many were not confident in the use of advanced bolus features (45.4%, n = 54) or exercising without upsetting blood glucose (33.6%, n = 40). 85.7% (n = 102) were satisfied with the quality of care received. Conclusions: CSII improved quality of life and, overall, users were confident to self-manage their diabetes. Use of advanced pump features, sick day rules and exercise were identified as areas to target in future education interventions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectContinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapyen
dc.subjectCSIIen
dc.subjectType 1 Diabetesen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.titleEffects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy on quality of life and patients' self-management: Clinical survey of routine clinical practice at Derby Teaching Hospital, UKen
dc.typeArticleen


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