Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorYang, Min
dc.contributor.authorWong, Stephen C. P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-06T12:39:52Z
dc.date.available2017-09-06T12:39:52Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationYang, M., Wong, S. C. P. & Coid, J. W. (2013). Violence, mental health and violence risk factors among women in the general population: An epidemiology study based on two national household surveys in the UK. BMC Public Health, (13), pp.1020.
dc.identifier.other10.1186/1471-2458-13-1020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/5200
dc.description© Yang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.description.abstractBackground: Females who perpetrated violence in the community have important mental health and public protection implications. There is a dearth of research in this area. This study investigated the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, personality disorders as well as victim characteristics and violence risk factors of women in the community who self-reported violence against others. Methods. The study sample consisted of 8,275 community women aged 16-74 years obtained from the 2000 and 2007 UK national psychiatric morbidity surveys. Self report incidences of violence, personality disorders and the presence of psychiatric symptoms were assessed by interviews and/or established structured psychiatric assessment protocols. Results: Weighted prevalence of female violence, which primarily involved partners and friends, was 5.5% in 2000 and 5.1% in 2007. Violence-prone women also had significantly higher prevalence of common mental disorders and comorbidity (adjusted odds ratio 3.3 and 2.9 respectively) than non-violent women. Multivariate analyses identified eight significant risk factors that characterized violence prone women: young age, residing in social-assisted housing, presence of early conduct problems, victim of domestic violence, self-harming, excessive drinking and past criminal justice involvements. Conclusion: A higher prevalence of common mental disorders and some types of personality disorder was found among violence prone women compared to their non-violence prone counterparts. The identified violence risk factors could be used to develop a quick and easily administered rating tool suitable for use by non-mental health trained frontline workers such as police and social support workers in the community to identify violence-prone women. Mental health and support services then can be provided to them for mental health care and violence prevention purposes. © 2013 Yang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.description.urihttp://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-13-1020
dc.formatFull text uploaded
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectPersonality disorders
dc.titleViolence, mental health and violence risk factors among women in the general population: An epidemiology study based on two national household surveys in the UK
dc.typeArticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-10T14:44:16Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Yang 2013 1-11.pdf
Size:
430.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record