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dc.contributor.authorNixon, Neil L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T14:50:13Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T14:50:13Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationNixon, N. L. (2011). Review of 'Freud on coke'. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 199 (4), pp.346.
dc.identifier.other10.1192/bjp.bp.111.094730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/5431
dc.description.abstractReviews the book, Freud on Coke by David Cohen (2011). Cohen lets us know early on that his work is part history and part polemic on the current place of drugs within society. The central story begins in the conversational manner of a late-night bar, developing some drama through damaging letters between Freud and Wilhelm Fleiss, which Freud managed to suppress during his lifetime through the help of a princess rather than a super injunction. Despite his energetic pursuit of success, Freud overlooked the significance of cocaine's anaesthetic properties and while his colleague, Karl Koller, blazed a trail for ophthalmic and dental surgery with the use of cocaine-anaesthetic across two continents, Freud pursued the ultimately less rewarding path of 'naso-sexual neuroses'. The Fleiss letters provide testimony of the dreadful injury inflicted on Freud's 'neurotic' patient Emma Eckstein along with Freud's continued heavy cocaine use during his eventual breakthrough with the published, edited analysis of his dreams. Within late capitalism this tradition of exploration has lapsed and the search for transcendence through psychedelics has given way to a search for the firmer, clearer ego boundaries of a growing range of 'neuro-enhancers' that promise to help us work harder rather than enabling us to 'open the doors of experience'. Although Cohen often finds his target, there is a good deal of collateral damage, particularly when examining professional involvement in psychotropic drugs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
dc.description.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry/article/freud-on-coke-by-david-cohen-cutting-edge-press-2011-950-hb-309pp-isbn-9780956544506/CB0040E6B29EC0FCD1CCEC4DC132919A
dc.subjectPsychotropic drugs
dc.titleReview of 'Freud on coke'
dc.typeBook review
html.description.abstractReviews the book, Freud on Coke by David Cohen (2011). Cohen lets us know early on that his work is part history and part polemic on the current place of drugs within society. The central story begins in the conversational manner of a late-night bar, developing some drama through damaging letters between Freud and Wilhelm Fleiss, which Freud managed to suppress during his lifetime through the help of a princess rather than a super injunction. Despite his energetic pursuit of success, Freud overlooked the significance of cocaine's anaesthetic properties and while his colleague, Karl Koller, blazed a trail for ophthalmic and dental surgery with the use of cocaine-anaesthetic across two continents, Freud pursued the ultimately less rewarding path of 'naso-sexual neuroses'. The Fleiss letters provide testimony of the dreadful injury inflicted on Freud's 'neurotic' patient Emma Eckstein along with Freud's continued heavy cocaine use during his eventual breakthrough with the published, edited analysis of his dreams. Within late capitalism this tradition of exploration has lapsed and the search for transcendence through psychedelics has given way to a search for the firmer, clearer ego boundaries of a growing range of 'neuro-enhancers' that promise to help us work harder rather than enabling us to 'open the doors of experience'. Although Cohen often finds his target, there is a good deal of collateral damage, particularly when examining professional involvement in psychotropic drugs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)


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