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dc.contributor.authorTedstone, Josephine E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T14:30:41Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T14:30:41Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationTedstone, J. E. & Tarrier, N. (1997). An investigation of the prevalence of psychological morbidity in burn-injured patients. Burns, 23 (7-8), pp.550-554.
dc.identifier.other10.1016/S0305-4179(97)00083-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/7374
dc.description.abstractResearch on the psychological impact of burn injuries has concentrated on major burns, while small burns have been largely neglected. In a prospective study, 45 patients with burn injuries ranging from 1 per cent or less up to 40 per cent total body surface area were assessed using semi-structured interviews within 2 weeks of sustaining the burn, and followed-up at approximately 3 months postburn to investigate the prevalence of mental health problems. The prevalence of clinically significant levels of anxiety, intrusions and avoidance remained similar at 2 weeks and 3 months postburn, however, the prevalence of depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) increased 6- and 4-times, respectively, by 3 months. Patients with small burn injuries of 1 per cent or less also experienced clinically significant levels of psychological difficulties postburn. The implications for the identification of patients at risk of future psychological morbidity are discussed.;
dc.description.urihttp://www.burnsjournal.com/article/S0305-4179(97)00083-1/fulltext
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectBurns
dc.subjectDepressive disorder
dc.subjectPost-traumatic stress disorders
dc.titleAn investigation of the prevalence of psychological morbidity in burn-injured patients
dc.typeArticle


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