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dc.contributor.authorDaley, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T14:53:46Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T14:53:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationDaley, D. (2016). 45.1 efficacy and cost-effectiveness of individual versus group-based parent training for preschool attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A multi-center randomized controlled trial. In: Martin, A., (Ed.) Scientific Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 24-29 October 2016 New York, United States. New York: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, p.S330.
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.385
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/7694
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The goal of this presentation is to compare the efficacy and cost effectiveness of New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP)-an individually delivered approach-with a group-based approach (incredible years, IY) and treatment as usual (TAU) in a sample group of preschool children with ADHD. Methods: The Comparison of Preschool Parenting Interventions (COPPI) trial was a three-arm parallel group, randomized controlled trial. The trial recruited 307 preschool children that met standard ADHD diagnostic criteria. Children were block-randomized to NFPP, IY, or TAU on a 3:3:1 ratio. NFPP is a specialist parent-training (PT) program for parents of preschool children with ADHD delivered on a one-to-one basis. The toddler version of IY is a group-based PT program delivered over 12-weekly sessions designed to address problems of challenging and oppositional conduct in young children. Results: In total, 307 participants were randomized (NFPP: N = 134; IY: N = 131; TAU: N = 42). The sample group included a high proportion of single parents (30 percent), low-income families, children with language difficulties (50 percent), and parents with mental health problems (77 percent). No statistically significant differences between NFPP and IY were observed in parent-assessed ADHD symptoms at T2 (primary end point: mean for NFPP, 1.715; mean for IY, 1.724; mean difference, -0.009; 95% CI -0.191 to 0.173; p = 0.921) or T3 or in other secondary or healthrelated outcomes at either T2 or T3. Small benefits of NFPP over TAU were seen for parent-rated ADHD (adjusted mean, 1.693 for NFPP and 1.881 for TAU; mean difference, -0.189; 95% CI -0.380 to 0.003; p = 0.053) and conduct problems (p < 0.05). NFPP was significantly less costly than IY (mean total cost per patient, 1,509 vs. 2,103), with the difference being attributed to higher intervention-related costs of IY. Cost utility analysis, in terms of incremental cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, showed that NFPP was dominant over IY and thus likely to be cost-effective, albeit based on small QALY gain differences. Conclusions: High-quality, group-based PT may be more expensive to deliver than some forms of individually delivered equally efficacious PT programs. Both formats should be available to families.
dc.description.urihttp://www.jaacap.com/article/S0890-8567(16)30734-1/fulltext
dc.subjectCosts and cost analysis
dc.subjectParents
dc.subjectAttention deficit disorder with hyperactivity
dc.title45.1 efficacy and cost-effectiveness of individual versus group-based parent training for preschool attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A multi-center randomized controlled trial
dc.typeConference Proceeding


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