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dc.contributor.authorDaley, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-06T15:23:11Z
dc.date.available2020-05-06T15:23:11Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationShimabukuro, S., Daley, D., Thompson, M., Laver-Bradbury, C., Lovern, K. & Tripp, G. (2020). Supporting Japanese mothers of children at risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A small scale randomized control trial of well parent Japan. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 29, pp. 1604-1616.en
dc.identifier.other10.1007/s10826-020-01704-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/7741
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Guidelines recommend parent management training in the multi-modal treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The availability of such interventions in Japan is limited. This study evaluated the effects of Well Parent Japan, a hybrid intervention including a group Japanese language adaptation of the New Forest Parenting Programme for ADHD (NFPP) augmented with strategies to improve parent’s psychological wellbeing and enhance confidence in their ability to implement change. Methods: Mothers of children aged 6–12 years displaying marked symptoms of ADHD were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 28) or a waitlist control condition (n = 24). Measures were completed at baseline and again 14 weeks later. Parenting stress was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included maternal depression, parenting self-efficacy, reported and observed parenting behaviour, and maternal ratings of child ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, and internalizing problems. Results: Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) compared the groups post intervention. Intervention mothers reported significantly less parenting stress, higher parenting self-esteem and use of more effective parenting strategies compared with controls, including a reduction in observed negative parenting, post intervention. These mothers also reported lower levels of child aggression and internalizing problems post intervention together with a trend (p < 0.05) toward reduced symptoms of inattention. Conclusions: Well Parent Japan is an effective psychosocial intervention for parents of children with ADHD in Japan. The group format and the session content is well tolerated. This is the first randomized control trial (RCT) of a psychosocial intervention targeting ADHD in Japan. © 2020, The Author(s).
dc.description.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-020-01704-6en
dc.subjectAttention deficit disorder with hyperactivityen
dc.subjectParentingen
dc.titleSupporting Japanese mothers of children at risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A small scale randomized control trial of well parent Japanen
dc.typeArticleen
html.description.abstractObjectives: Guidelines recommend parent management training in the multi-modal treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The availability of such interventions in Japan is limited. This study evaluated the effects of Well Parent Japan, a hybrid intervention including a group Japanese language adaptation of the New Forest Parenting Programme for ADHD (NFPP) augmented with strategies to improve parent’s psychological wellbeing and enhance confidence in their ability to implement change. Methods: Mothers of children aged 6–12 years displaying marked symptoms of ADHD were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 28) or a waitlist control condition (n = 24). Measures were completed at baseline and again 14 weeks later. Parenting stress was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included maternal depression, parenting self-efficacy, reported and observed parenting behaviour, and maternal ratings of child ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, and internalizing problems. Results: Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) compared the groups post intervention. Intervention mothers reported significantly less parenting stress, higher parenting self-esteem and use of more effective parenting strategies compared with controls, including a reduction in observed negative parenting, post intervention. These mothers also reported lower levels of child aggression and internalizing problems post intervention together with a trend (p < 0.05) toward reduced symptoms of inattention. Conclusions: Well Parent Japan is an effective psychosocial intervention for parents of children with ADHD in Japan. The group format and the session content is well tolerated. This is the first randomized control trial (RCT) of a psychosocial intervention targeting ADHD in Japan. © 2020, The Author(s).


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