Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDening, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-09T10:20:19Z
dc.date.available2017-11-09T10:20:19Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationLafortune, L., Martin, S., Brayne, C., Fox, C., Cullum, S., Dening, T., Rait, G. & Katona, C. (2013). There is no evidence supporting population screening for dementia: Reporting on a systematic review of costs and benefits. In: Khachaturian, Z. S., (Ed.) Alzheimer's Association International Conference, 13-18 July 2013 Boston, United States. Philadelphia: Alzheimer's and Dementia, p.845.en
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.jalz.2013.08.010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/7932
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite over a decade of efforts to improve timely detection, as many as 50% of people with dementia still do not receive a formal diagnosis or receive it too late. Population screening may provide part of the solution. However, it's relative costs and benefits are still unclear. We undertook a broad systematic review of population screening - here we report on the evidence pertaining to the clinical, psychosocial and economic outcomes. Methods: Eligible studies included those looking at population screening either as a standalone or component of a dementia intervention compared with a routine pattern of care in general population or non-selected general practice or community care attendees. Models were included only in the review of economic outcomes. Relevant papers published by May 2012 were identified by unlimited database searches (including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, DARE) tailored to individual outcome categories. The AMSTAR tool guided the review process. Results: We found no evidence of the effect of screening on patient outcomes such as cognitive, mental or emotional health, social function, or planning.We didn't identify any studies looking at potential harms caused by the screening results (such as risk of depression, anxiety, stigma or independence). For economic outcomes (n=6), 3 primary studies reported on the direct cost per patient diagnosed; 2 related modelling studies compared a population screening scenario to other models of dementia care and one looked at screening in older drivers. These suggests that substantial resources are required to screen for dementia, which are determined by the age of the screened population, the properties of the screening instrument and the extent to which general practitioners are involved in follow-up assessments. Conclusions: The pressure for faster diagnosis and for population screening is increasing despite the lack of effective early treatment. Yet we found no evidence that, if rolled out, population screening would lead to better clinical or psychosocial outcomes, no evidence furthering our understanding of the risks it entails, and no indication of it's added value compared to current practice. Policy makers should be cautious about the adoption of population screening for dementia without any evidence of benefits or risks.en
dc.description.urihttp://www.alzheimersanddementia.com/article/S1552-5260(13)02507-7/fulltext
dc.subjectMass screeningen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectGeneral practiceen
dc.titleThere is no evidence supporting population screening for dementia: Reporting on a systematic review of costs and benefitsen
dc.typeConference Proceeding


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record