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dc.contributor.authorGuo, Boliang
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T14:20:48Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T14:20:48Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationTurner, D., Sach, T., Carter, T., Callaghan, P. & Guo, B. (2017). Cost-effectiveness of a preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with treatment as usual: An economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial in the UK. BMJ Open, 7 (11).en
dc.identifier.other10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016211
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/8533
dc.description© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.abstractObjectives To assess the cost-effectiveness of preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with a treatment as usual control group. Design A 'within trial' cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial. The perspective of the analysis was the UK National Health Service and social services. setting The intervention was provided in a community leisure centre setting. Participants 86 young people aged 14-17 years attending Tier 2 and Tier 3 CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services) outpatient services presenting with depression. Interventions The intervention comprised 12 separate sessions of circuit training over a 6-week period. Sessions were supervised by a qualified exercise therapist. Participants also received treatment as usual. The comparator group received treatment as usual. results We found improvements in the Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) and estimated cost-effectiveness at 61 per point improvement in CDI-2 for the exercise group compared with control. We found no evidence that the exercise intervention led to differences in quality-adjusted life years (QALY). QALYs were estimated using the EQ-5D-5L (5-level version of EuroQol-5 dimension). conclusions There is evidence that exercise can be an effective intervention for adolescents with depression and the current study shows that preferred intensity exercise could also represent a cost-effective intervention in terms of the CDI-2.<br/>Copyright &#xa9; 2017 BMJ Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.description.urihttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/11/e016211
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dc.subjectCosts and cost analysisen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectMental health servicesen
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen
dc.titleCost-effectiveness of a preferred intensity exercise programme for young people with depression compared with treatment as usual: An economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial in the UKen
dc.typeArticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-14T10:14:13Z


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