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dc.contributor.authorSayal, Kapil
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-29T14:20:37Z
dc.date.available2017-09-29T14:20:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationSayal, K. (2015). Editorial: Evidence-guided interventions and optimising outcomes in routine clinical care of children and young people's mental health. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 20 (3), pp.129-130.
dc.identifier.other10.1111/camh.12116
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9074
dc.description.abstractThis Editorial reflects on several articles in this issue of the journal that focus on evidence-based interventions in routine clinical care. In particular, it highlights the approaches advocated in the review by Bearman & Weisz into overcoming barriers to the implementation of research findings into routine clinical care: conceptually unified treatments that acknowledge the overlap and comorbidity between presenting problems; modular approaches to co-ordinate and combine treatment approaches to improve the fit for young people presenting with multiple problems; and approaches to monitoring and feedback of progress and outcomes to aid clinical review and decision-making. Issues of access, stigma and measurement of meaningful outcomes in routine clinical practice are also considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
dc.description.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/camh.12116/full
dc.subjectEvidence-based practice
dc.subjectMental health services
dc.subjectStigma
dc.titleEditorial: Evidence-guided interventions and optimising outcomes in routine clinical care of children and young people's mental health
dc.typeEditorial
html.description.abstractThis Editorial reflects on several articles in this issue of the journal that focus on evidence-based interventions in routine clinical care. In particular, it highlights the approaches advocated in the review by Bearman & Weisz into overcoming barriers to the implementation of research findings into routine clinical care: conceptually unified treatments that acknowledge the overlap and comorbidity between presenting problems; modular approaches to co-ordinate and combine treatment approaches to improve the fit for young people presenting with multiple problems; and approaches to monitoring and feedback of progress and outcomes to aid clinical review and decision-making. Issues of access, stigma and measurement of meaningful outcomes in routine clinical practice are also considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)


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