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dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Justine
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-29T14:20:37Z
dc.date.available2017-09-29T14:20:37Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSchneider, J. & Bramley, C. J. (2008). Towards social inclusion in mental health? Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 14 (2), pp.131-138.
dc.identifier.other10.1192/apt.bp.106.003350
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9101
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the uses of the terms social exclusion and social inclusion in a mental health context. We briefly describe the origins of the term social exclusion and analyse its connotations in relation to four key dimensions: the relative, multifactorial, dynamic and transactional. We discuss Levitas's three discourses concerning social exclusion (the redistributionist, moral underclass and social integrationist) and present a case in favour of a fourth perspective, societal oppression. Focusing on social inclusion as a remedy for the ills of social exclusion, we discuss implications for contemporary mental health policy, practice and research. We highlight the potential contribution of social psychology to social inclusion theory. We conclude that a better theoretical understanding of causal mechanisms is needed to enable the development of more socially inclusive mental health services.
dc.description.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/advances-in-psychiatric-treatment/article/towards-social-inclusion-in-mental-health/1E468B4BD2792A816BA44F6CD490A5B4
dc.subjectSocialisation
dc.subjectSocial distance
dc.subjectMental health
dc.titleTowards social inclusion in mental health?
dc.typeArticle


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