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dc.contributor.authorClegg, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-28T16:03:59Z
dc.date.available2017-11-28T16:03:59Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationClegg, J. (2000). Beyond ethical individualism. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 44 (1), pp.1-11.en
dc.identifier.other10.1046/j.1365-2788.2000.00257.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9152
dc.description.abstractContemporary ethical debate about clinical practice centers primarily on the individual resolution of dilemmas, an approach which is incompatible with the social constructionist focus on human interdependence. Many constructionists argue that virtue ethics (VE) offers a more useful perspective on ethics than either consequentialism or deontology. From this perspective, the purpose of ethics is not to specify the right act in a particular situation, but to understand ethical and unethical practices conceptually, i.e. how these are learned, and how these contribute to and develop the ethical life in an ethical environment. Criticisms of VE are considered alongside discussion of its implications for clinical practice with people who have intellectual disability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)en
dc.description.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2788.2000.00257.x/abstract
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectMental disordersen
dc.titleBeyond ethical individualismen
dc.typeArticle


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