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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T11:42:54Z
dc.date.available2018-01-05T11:42:54Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationWatson, E. (2017). The mechanisms underpinning peer support: a literature review. Journal of Mental Health, 28 (6), pp. 677-688.en
dc.identifier.other10.1080/09638237.2017.1417559
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9185
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUNDThe employment of Peer Support Workers, who themselves have experience of significant emotional distress, can promote recovery at an individual and organisational level. While research examining the benefits of peer support within mental health services continues to grow, an understanding of how, and through what processes, these benefits are reached remains under-developed.AIMSTo review the published research literature relating to the process of peer support and its underpinning mechanisms to better understand how and why it works.METHODA scoping review of published literature identified studies relating to peer support mechanisms, processes and relationships. Studies were summarised and findings analysed.RESULTSFive mechanisms were found to underpin peer support relationships (lived experience, love labour, the liminal position of the peer worker, strengths-focussed social and practical support, and the helper role).CONCLUSIONSThe identified mechanisms can underpin both the success and difficulties associated with peer support relationships. Further research should review a broader range of literature and clarify how these mechanisms contribute to peer support in different contexts.en
dc.description.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638237.2017.1417559
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectSocial supporten
dc.subjectPeer support
dc.titleThe mechanisms underpinning peer support: a literature reviewen
dc.typeArticle


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