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dc.contributor.authorCraven, Michael P.
dc.contributor.authorRawsthorne, Mat
dc.contributor.authorButler, Debbie
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sue
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-24T15:24:01Z
dc.date.available2019-04-24T15:24:01Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationCraven, M. P., Goodwin, R., Rawsthorne, M., Butler, D., Waddingham, P., Brown, S. & Jamieson, M. (2019). Try to see it my way: exploring the co-design of visual presentations of wellbeing through a workshop process. Perspectives in Public Health, 139 (3), pp.153-161.en
dc.identifier.other10.1177/1757913919835231
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9199
dc.description.abstractAIMS:: A 10-month project funded by the NewMind network sought to develop the specification of a visualisation toolbox that could be applied on digital platforms (web- or app-based) to support adults with lived experience of mental health difficulties to present and track their personal wellbeing in a multi-media format. METHODS:: A participant co-design methodology, Double Diamond from the Design Council (Great Britain), was used consisting of four phases: Discover - a set of literature and app searches of wellbeing and health visualisation material; Define - an initial workshop with participants with lived experience of mental health problems to discuss wellbeing and visualisation techniques and to share personal visualisations; Develop - a second workshop to add detail to personal visualisations, for example, forms of media to be employed, degree of control over sharing; and Deliver - to disseminate the learning from the exercise. RESULTS:: Two design workshops were held in December 2017 and April 2018 with 13 and 12 experts-by-experience involved, respectively, including two peer researchers (co-authors) and two individual-carer dyads in each workshop, with over 50% of those being present in both workshops. A total of 20 detailed visualisations were produced, the majority focusing on highly personal and detailed presentations of wellbeing. DISCUSSION:: While participants concurred on a range of typical dimensions of wellbeing, the individual visualisations generated were in contrast to the techniques currently employed by existing digital wellbeing apps and there was a great diversity in preference for different visualisation types. Participants considered personal visualisations to be useful as self-administered interventions or as a step towards seeking help, as well as being tools for self-appraisal. CONCLUSION:: The results suggest that an authoring approach using existing apps may provide the high degree of flexibility required. Training on such tools, delivered via a module on a recovery college course, could be offered.en
dc.description.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1757913919835231en
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.titleTry to see it my way: exploring the co-design of visual presentations of wellbeing through a workshop processen
dc.typeArticleen


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