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dc.contributor.authorBergin, Aislinn
dc.contributor.authorDavies, E. Bethan
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-06T11:44:18Z
dc.date.available2020-02-06T11:44:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationBergin, A. & Davies, E. B. (2019). Technology Matters: Mental health apps – separating the wheat from the chaff. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 25 (1), pp.51-53.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9241
dc.description.abstractYoung people are more connected to their phones than ever—by 12 over 80% of young people in the UK have their own smartphone. Whilst this rate of access may concern some, it does provide a clear opportunity for young people to access mental health support, advice and tools in a timely and engaging way in the form of apps. ‘Mental Health App’ is a catch‐all term that is used to describe applications (‘apps’) for mobile devices with a variety of purposes and functions. For young people, this can include (but is not limited to) mood symptom assessment, monitoring and tracking, strategies to aid mood or symptoms like anxiety, and educating users about mental health. As the number and complexity of these apps increase, so does their potential relevance to practitioners. There are now apps that provide interventions directly to the user (such as BlueIce (Stallard, Porter, & Grist, 2018), which was developed by clinicians in partnership with young people with experience of self‐harm) and apps that aim to support and enhance the therapeutic process (such as Power Up (Edbrooke‐Childs et al., 2019), which aims to help children better communicate their needs to services). With many thousands of apps claiming to address mental health and well‐being and more apps coming on the market every month, how can practitioners identify those that may be beneficial? Simply searching app stores using keywords will result in large numbers of apps, many of which are likely to be at best irrelevant and at worst dangerous or examples of modern‐day quackery. So how can practitioners decide which they can confidently recommend to young people?en
dc.description.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/camh.12363en
dc.subjectTelemedicineen
dc.subjectMood disordersen
dc.subjectTelecommunicationsen
dc.titleTechnology Matters: Mental health apps – separating the wheat from the chaffen
dc.typeArticleen


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