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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Richard C.
dc.contributor.authorKhalifa, Najat
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Conor
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T15:59:56Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T15:59:56Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHoward, R. C., Khalifa, N., Duggan, C. & Lumsden, J. (2012). Are patients deemed 'dangerous and severely personality disordered' different from other personality disordered patients detained in forensic settings? Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 22 (1), pp.65-78.
dc.identifier.other10.1002/cbm.827
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9398
dc.descriptionThis is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Howard, R. C., Khalifa, N., Duggan, C. & Lumsden, J. (2012). Are patients deemed 'dangerous and severely personality disordered' different from other personality disordered patients detained in forensic settings? Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 22 (1), pp.65-78, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbm.827. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
dc.description.abstractBackground: In 1999, the UK government initiated a programme for the assessment and treatment of individuals deemed to have 'dangerous and severe personality disorder' (DSPD). After over 10 years of specialist service development, it is not clear whether DSPD patients represent a distinct group.; Aims: The aim of this study was to establish whether people admitted to DSPD hospital units could be distinguished in presentation or personality traits from people with personality disorder admitted to standard secure hospital services.; Methods: Thirty-eight men detained in high-security hospital DSPD units were compared with 62 men detained in conventional medium or high security hospital units, using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and other standard personality disorder, clinical and offending measures.; Results: Compared with their counterparts in standard services, the DSPD group had higher scores on PCL-R psychopathy, significantly more convictions before age 18 years, greater severity of institutional violence and more prior crimes of sexual violence. Regression analysis confirmed that only PCL-R Factor 1, reflecting core interpersonal and affective features of psychopathy, predicted group membership.; Conclusion: The DSPD group emerged as having higher psychopathy scores, but as there is currently no evidence that the core personality features of psychopathy are amenable to treatment, there is little justification for treating high-psychopathy forensic patients differently from those with other disorders of personality.; Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.description.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cbm.827/full
dc.formatFull text uploaded
dc.subjectDangerous and severe personality disorder
dc.subjectPersonality disorders
dc.subjectPsychopathology
dc.subjectChecklist
dc.subjectHigh security facilities
dc.titleAre patients deemed 'dangerous and severely personality disordered' different from other personality disordered patients detained in forensic settings?
dc.typeArticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-14T10:50:43Z


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