Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorClarke, Martin
dc.contributor.authorFardouly, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMcMurran, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T15:59:39Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T15:59:39Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationClarke, M., Fardouly, P. & McMurran, M. (2013). A survey of how clinicians in forensic personality disorder services engage their service users in treatment. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, 24 (6), pp.772-787.
dc.identifier.other10.1080/14789949.2013.862292
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9627
dc.description.abstractNon-completion is a significant problem in treatments for personality disorder (PD), and is associated with poorer outcomes. Clinicians routinely attend to engagement issues with people diagnosed with PD and so we accessed their views about the techniques they used to facilitate treatment engagement with service users with PD. Twenty-three clinicians from a range of disciplines were asked how they defined treatment engagement, what they thought were the causes of treatment engagement problems in people with PD, and what techniques or strategies they used to enhance engagement of people with PD. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Staff working with people with PD have broad views on the factors that are implicated in treatment engagement for their client group. Consequently, the techniques they use to engage service users are wide-ranging, addressing issues to do with services, individuals, therapies and therapists. Given the limited published data thus far, the suggestions generated may be of value to other practitioners in improving service user engagement. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.
dc.description.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14789949.2013.862292
dc.subjectPersonality disorders
dc.subjectAttitude of health personnel
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations
dc.subjectSurveys and questionnaires
dc.titleA survey of how clinicians in forensic personality disorder services engage their service users in treatment
dc.typeArticle


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record