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dc.contributor.authorMcMurran, Mary
dc.contributor.authorCoupe, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorHedges, Lucy
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T16:00:08Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T16:00:08Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMcMurran, M., Cox, W. M., Coupe, S., Whitham, D. & Hedges, L. (2010). The addition of a goal-based motivational interview to standardised treatment as usual to reduce dropouts in a service for patients with personality disorder: A feasibility study. Trials, 11, pp.5.
dc.identifier.other10.1186/1745-6215-11-98
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9716
dc.description.abstractBackground: Rates of non-completion of treatments for personality disorder are high and there are indications that those who do not complete treatment have worse outcomes than those who do. Improving both cost-efficiency and client welfare require attention to engaging people with personality disorder in treatment. A motivational interview, based on the Personal Concerns Inventory, may have the ability to enhance engagement and retention in therapy. Here, we report the protocol for a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods: All referrals accepted to the psychological service of Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust's outpatient service for people with personality disorder are eligible for inclusion. Consenting participants are randomised to receive the Personal Concerns Inventory interview plus treatment as usual or treatment as usual only. We aim to recruit 100 participants over 11/2 years. A randomised controlled trial will be considered feasible if [1] the recruitment rate to the project is 54% of all referrals (95% CI 54-64), [2] 80% of clients find the intervention acceptable in terms of its practicability and usefulness (95% CI 80-91), and [3] 80% of therapists report finding the intervention helpful (95% CI 80-100). In a full-scale randomised controlled trial, the primary outcome measure will be completion of treatment i.e., entry into and completion of >= 75% of sessions offered. Therefore, information will be collected on recruitment rates, attendance at therapy sessions, and completion of treatment. The feasibility of examining the processes of engagement will be tested by assessing the value, coherence, and attainability of goals pre-treatment, and engagement in treatment. The costs associated with the intervention will be calculated, and the feasibility of calculating the cost-benefits of the intervention will be tested. The views of clients and therapists on the intervention, collected using semi-structured interviews, will be analysed using thematic analysis. Discussion: The Personal Concerns Interview as a preparation for treatment of people with personality has the potential to maximise treatment uptake, reduce unfilled places in treatment programmes, and prevent group treatments faltering through non-attendance. Most importantly, it has the potential to improve patient outcomes, helping them to function better and reduce hospitalisation.
dc.description.urihttps://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-11-98
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dc.subjectPersonality disorders
dc.subjectPsychiatric status rating scales
dc.titleThe addition of a goal-based motivational interview to standardised treatment as usual to reduce dropouts in a service for patients with personality disorder: A feasibility study
dc.typeArticle
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-14T10:51:27Z


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