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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-03T13:16:24Z
dc.date.available2018-10-03T13:16:24Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationWhale, K., Green, K. & Browne, K. (2018). Attachment style, psychotic phenomena and the relationship with aggression: An investigation in a general population sample. Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, 11 (1), pp. 47-58.en
dc.identifier.issn10.1108/JACPR-04-2018-0356
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/9982
dc.descriptionArticle as accepted for publication in Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JACPR-04-2018-0356
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between attachment style, sub-clinical symptoms of psychosis and aggression in a general population sample. Design/methodology/approach: Using both convenience and snowball sampling, participants in the community (n=213) completed an online questionnaire including previously validated measures of adult attachment, aggression and psychotic experiences. Findings: Results suggested that there were statistically significant correlations between all study variables. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that total psychotic-like experiences and attachment scores significantly predicted variance in total aggression. Moderation approaches revealed that the relationship between psychotic-like events and aggression was stronger in individuals with more insecure attachment styles. Research limitations/implications: This generalisability of the results is compromised by the sampling methodology and the use of self-report tools. However, the significant results would support larger scale replications investigating similar variables. Originality/value: This study suggests there is a relationship between psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and facets of aggression in the general population. These results suggest that attachment is a contributing factor to aggression associated with PLEs, and highlight the need for similar investigations within clinical samples. The results imply that attachment may be a useful construct for explanatory models of the relationship between adverse childhood experiences, psychotic experiences and aggression.en
dc.description.urihttps://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/JACPR-04-2018-0356en
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dc.subjectRisk assessmenten
dc.subjectAggressionen
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen
dc.subjectPsychosisen
dc.titleAttachment style, psychotic phenomena and the relationship with aggression: An investigation in a general population sampleen
dc.typeArticleen
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-14T11:08:19Z


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